Australian State Firearm Storage Regulations

 

Victoria:  

website: http://www.police.vic.gov.au/content.asp?Document_ID=36210)

Longarm licences for category A and B longarms
(1) The firearm must be stored in a receptacle—
(a) which is constructed of hard wood or steel that is not easily penetrable; and
(b) which, if it weighs less than 150 kilograms when it is empty, must be fixed to the frame of the floor or the wall of the premises where the firearm is kept in such a manner that it is not easily removable; and
(c) which, when any firearm is stored in it, is locked with a lock of sturdy construction.
(2) If more than 15 firearms are stored on the premises where the firearm is stored, the premises must be fitted with an intruder alarm system—
(a) the installation, maintenance and operation of which complies with Australian Standard 2201.1:2007 (as amended from time to time);
and
(b) which, in the event of an intrusion, activates an audible alarm warning device and an external visible alarm warning light.
(3) Any cartridge ammunition for the firearm must be stored in a locked container separate from the receptacle in which the firearm must be stored.
(4) Subject to section 121, a firearm that is possessed, carried or used by a holder of a handgun security guard licence who is employed as a security guard must be stored by the person who employs the
holder of the licence as a security guard at (Sch. 4 Sch. 4 item 1(2) substituted by No. 50/2007 s. 56(1). Sch. 4 item 1(3) amended by No. 22/1998 s. 43(Sch. item 17(a)). Sch. 4 item 1(4) inserted by No. 50/2007 s. 56(2).  Firearms Act 1996 No. 66 of 1996 299 premises belonging to, or occupied by, the employer

Longarm licences for category C or category D
Longarms and handgun licences for general category handguns
(1) The firearm must be stored in a steel safe—
(a) which is of a thickness that is not easily penetrable; and
(b) which, if it weighs less than 150 kilograms when it is empty, must be bolted to the structure of the premises where the firearm is authorised to be kept; and

(c) which, when any firearm is stored in it, is locked.
(2) If more than 15 firearms are stored on the premises where the firearm is stored, the premises must be fitted with an intruder alarm system—
(a) the installation, maintenance and operation of which complies with Australian Standard 2201.1:2007 (as amended from time to time);
and
(b) which, in the event of an intrusion, activates an audible alarm warning device and an external visible alarm warning light.
(2A) The key to the container in which the firearm is stored must—
(a) be carried by the holder of the licence; or
(b) be kept securely in a separate room from the container— when the container is not being accessed.
(3) Any cartridge ammunition for the firearm must be stored in a locked container separate from the safe in which the firearm must be stored.
(4) Subject to section 121, a firearm that is possessed, carried or used by a holder of a handgun security guard licence who is employed as a security guard must be stored by the person who employs the
holder of the licence as a security guard at (Sch. 4 Sch. 4 item 1(2) substituted by No. 50/2007 s. 56(1). Sch. 4 item 1(3) amended by No. 22/1998 s. 43(Sch. item 17(a)). Sch. 4 item 1(4) inserted by No. 50/2007 s. 56(2).  Firearms Act 1996 No. 66 of 1996 299 premises belonging to, or occupied by, the employer

 

New South Wales:

website: http://www.police.nsw.gov.au/services/firearms/safe_storage

What are the legislative safe storage requirements for Category A & B firearms?

Section 40 of the Act provides mandatory minimum requirements for the safe keeping and storage of firearms held under a Category A & B licence as follows:
* When any firearm is not actually being used or carried, it must be stored in a locked receptacle of a type approved by the Commissioner of Police and that is constructed of hard wood or steel and not easily penetrable.
* If the receptacle weighs less than 150 kilograms when empty, it must be fixed in order to prevent its easy removal.
* The locks of such a receptacle must be of solid metal and be of a type approved by the Commissioner.
* Any ammunition for the firearm must be stored in a locked container of a type approved by the Commissioner. Ammunition may be kept in the receptacle with the firearms, but must be kept in a separate locked container within the receptacle. Failure to meet these requirements is a serious offence with a fine of $2200 or 12 months imprisonment, or both.

Do I have to secure my receptacle to the premises?
Yes. If the receptacle used for storing the firearms weighs less than 150kg (when empty), the receptacle must be secured to the structure of the building. The receptacle should be secured by way of expanding anchor bolts (or similar) fixed internally through the base and/or back of the receptacle. The securing points should not be visible or accessible externally from the receptacle.
* When mounted onto brick, stone or concrete, it should be attached by at least four (4) masonry anchors 90mm in length and 10mm in diameter internally fitted through holes in the rear and/or base of the container, securing it to the floor and/or wall. The receptacle should be mounted flush with the floor and/or wall.
* When mounted onto main wall studs or wall bearers, it should be fitted flush against the wall and secured to the wall studs and/or floor bearers by four (4) galvanized hexagon head coach screws, not less than 65mm in length and 8mm in diameter. The receptacle should be mounted flush with the floor and/or wall.

What are the approved receptacles for Category A & B safe storage?

Firearms Registry The Commissioner has determined the following as the minimum standard applicable for the receptacle and locking mechanisms for Category A & B safe storage.
Any receptacle or lock must meet or exceed the following features to comply with section 40(1) of the Act.

What are the minimum standards for locking mechanisms?
The minimum standards for the locking mechanisms for a Level 1 receptacle are as follows:
* The door should be fitted with a three point locking mechanism (or similar) which secures the door to the receptacle at various points around the door to prevent unauthorised entry to the receptacle, OR
* The door should be fitted with a locking mechanism which is equivalent to or exceeds that of a three point locking mechanism, (eg. a deadbolt or padlock). * If the safe requires the fitting of an external lock (ie padlock), the lock must have a minimum body width of 40mm and a hardened steel shackle. Any receptacle must be secure enough to prevent unauthorised entry. If police determine, upon inspection, that the receptacle is easily penetrated, due to the material used, or the type of lock, or the ease of using a crow bar or similar to jemmy open the door, or the positioning of the receptacle, police will not pass
the inspection and will advise on the alterations required to make the receptacle compliant.

What are the safe storage requirements for Category C, D & H firearms?
Section 41 of the Act provides mandatory minimum requirements for the safe keeping and storage of firearms held under a Category C, D & H licence as follows:
* When a firearm is not actually being used or carried, it must be stored in a locked steel safe of a type approved by the Commissioner, that cannot be easily penetrated.
* The safe must be bolted to the structure of the premises where the firearm is authorised to be kept.
* Any ammunition for the firearm must be stored in a locked container of a type approved by the Commissioner. Ammunition may be kept in the receptacle with the firearms, but must be kept in a separate locked container within the receptacle. Failure to meet these requirements is a serious offence with a fine of $5,500 or 2 years imprisonment, or both.

Do I have to secure my receptacle to the premises?
Yes. The safe must be secured to the structure of the premises – section 41 (1)(b) of the Act. Consideration should be given to the positioning & mounting of the safe. The safe should be positioned in a way that makes it difficult to jemmy open. For example a safe placed in a corner with the lock closest to the wall would be more difficult to cut or jemmy open. The safe must be bolted to the premises by way of internally fitted bolts or screws through the base or back of the safe. The securing points should not be visible or accessible externally to the safe.

Mounting of the Safe
* When mounted onto brick, stone or concrete, it should be attached by at least four (4) masonry anchors 90mm in length and 10mm in diameter internally fitted through holes in the rear and/or base of the container, securing it to the floor and/or wall. The safe should be flush against the floor and/or wall.
* When mounted onto main wall studs or wall bearers, it should be fitted flush against the wall and secured to the wall studs and floor bearers by four (4) galvanized hexagon head coach screws, not less than 65mm in length and 8mm in diameter.

What are the minimum standards for safes for C, D & H firearms?

Firearms Registry The minimum standards, as determined by the Commissioner of Police for the safe to be approved are as follows:
* The safe should be constructed of structural grade 250 mild steel conforming with AS3679 and be not less than 6mm in thickness for pistols and 3mm for longarms and be constructed with continuous welding on all external edges; and
* It should be fitted with a door not less than 6mm thick, swung on either concealed pivots, or externally mounted sealed end hinges welded to the door and body of the safe, with a clearance round the door of not more than 1mm; and
* If hinged, have a locking bar or dogging bolts welded to the inside face of the door near the hinge edge, which engages in a rebate in the container body when the door is closed; and
* Be fitted with a pick resistant deadbolt locking mechanism that is activated by either a six lever key, or pin/combination lock or biometric scanning (ie: fingerprint etc). The lock should be securely affixed to the rear face of the door and a metal strap overlapping the lock case with each end welded to hardened steel anti drill plates (3mm mild case hardened to 60 Rockwell CO) which will in turn be welded to the door; and
* Be constructed with a full length rebate welded to the side of the container body. Locking edge to receive the deadbolt of the locking mechanism; and
* A pistol safe should be constructed to leave a 10mm skirt formed by the recessing of the back plate from the outer edges of the sides, top and bottom wall plates to prevent jemmying.

 

Queensland:  

website: http://www.police.qld.gov.au/programs/weaponsLicensing/licenceApplication/storage

Legislative requirements for Category A, B and C firearms storage
Section 60 of the Weapons Regulation 1996 (Qld) provides minimum requirements for safe storage of firearms.
For Category A, B and C firearms:
• The container must be of a rigid structure, made of either solid steel or solid timber;
• Rigid structure refers to the strength of the container and the use of reasonable force to the sides or top of the container should not result in deflections of the panel or the container
• The term solid, requires that the container panels are continuous (eg without venting/holes or perforation)
• The container must be either steel (aluminium/alloys are not compliant) or solid timber. Species of timber or structural and marine ply are compliant. Chipboard, particle board, MDF and plaster board are not compliant.
• If the container used for storing these firearms weighs less than 150kg, it must be securely fixed to the frame or floor of a permanent building;
• The container must have a sturdy combination lock, keyed lock or keyed padlock;
• The container must be locked other than for the time to remove/replace firearms; and
• Firearms must be unloaded and the bolt must be removed or action broken for storage. The bolt is a major component part and is subject to same storage requirements as the firearm and can be stored with the firearm.Ammunition must be stored in a secure container or secured area that is separate from the container that holds the firearms; for example a gun safe with a internal secured area for the ammunition (Section 85 and 86 of the Explosives Regulations 2003 [Qld]).

Legislative requirements for Category D, H or R firearms storage
Section 60 of the Weapons Regulation provides minimum requirements for safe keeping of Category D, H and R firearms including:
• The container must of a rigid structure, made of solid steel;
• Be bolted to the frame or floor of a permanent building;
• The container must have a sturdy combination lock, keyed lock or keyed padlock;
• The container must be locked other than for the time to remove/replace firearm; and
• Firearms must be unloaded and the action broken for storage Ammunition must be stored in a secure container or secured area that is separate from the container that holds the firearms; for example a gun safe with a internal secured area for the ammunition (Section 85 and 86 of the Explosives Regulations 2003 [Qld]).
If more than 30 firearms are stored at the one premises (total firearms for all licensees), the firearms must be stored in accordance with Sections 39 to 43 of the Weapons Regulation.

 

 

Western Australia:  

website: http://www.police.wa.gov.au/Ourservices/PoliceLicensingServices/Firearms/Firearmsstorage

1. Construction

Specifications for storage cabinets or containers

  • The cabinet or container is to be constructed of mild steel that is 2 mm thick.
  • A joint between 2 faces that is butt welded is to have a continuous weld along the full length of the joint.
  • A joint where the edge of one face is folded over the edge of another face is to be stitch welded, with welds of at least 20 mm in length at intervals of not more than 100 mm between welds.
  • Spot welding is not to be used on the joints between faces.
  • The cabinet or container is to be so designed that no firearm or ammunition within it can be removed from it while it is locked.
  • In this clause – ‘face’ means a side, the top, or the bottom, of the cabinet or container.

2. Doors

  • Doors are to be recessed into the surrounding frame with margins of not more than 4 mm.
  • Each edge of the door and door frame is to be internally supported and have a return of at least 10 mm.
  • The cabinet or container is to have an internal stop of at least 10 mm against which each edge of the door, other than the hinged edge, closes.
  • The supports and stops required by subclauses (2) and (3) are to be welded at the corners.

3. Hinging mechanisms

  • Hinge protection is to be provided in such a way that, if the hinges are removed, the door of the cabinet or container remains in place and locked.
  • If the hinged edge of the door is not longer than 1 metre, 2 hinges are required on it, and if it is longer than 1 metre, an additional hinge is required for each additional 500 mm or part thereof.
  • If 2 hinges are required, the distance between them is to be not less than one-third of the length of the hinged edge.
  • If more than 2 hinges are required the distance between adjacent hinges is to be the same and that is also to be the distance from each of the outermost hinges to the nearest end of the hinged edge.
  • If a spindle is used instead of hinges, it is to extend the full length of the hinged edge of the door and is to be attached to the door by welds the number and placement of which comply with the requirements of subclauses (2), (3), and (4) for the number and placement of hinges.
  • If, instead of using hinges, the door swings on a spindle or on pivots not extending the full length of the hinged edge of the door, the cabinet or container is to incorporate a return protecting the hinged edge, along its full length, against the use of a jemmy.

4. Locks and locking points

  • If the swinging edge of the door is not longer than 500 mm, one lock is required with a locking point half way along that edge.
  • If the swinging edge is longer than 500 mm but not longer than 1.5 metres —

a) 2 locks are required each with a separate locking point along the swinging edge; and
b) the distance between the 2 locking points is to be not less than one-third of the length of the swinging edge.

  • If the swinging edge is longer than 1.5 metres —

a) for each additional 500 mm or part thereof there is to be an additional lock with a separate locking point along the swinging edge; and
b) the distance between adjacent locking points is to be the same and that is also to be the distance from each of the outermost locking points to the nearest end of the swinging edge.

  • It is sufficient compliance with subclause (2) if, when the swinging edge is longer than 500 mm but not longer than 1.5 metres, there is one lock with at least 3 separate locking points.
  • Each lock is to have a 5 pin mechanism that deadlocks the bolt in the locked position until it is properly unlocked.
  • If the locking bolt is designed to be released by a handle or lever, the design is to be such that, if the handle or lever is forcibly removed while the door is locked, the bolt remains in the locked position.
  • The cabinet or container is to be fitted with a protective structure to guard against the forcible removal of any lock.
  • In this clause —

locking point” means the point at which the bolt locks the door to the cabinet or container, preventing the door from opening;
swinging edge” means the edge of the door opposite the hinged edge.

5. Anchoring

  • The cabinet or container is to be securely anchored from the inside at 2 points on each of 2 separate surfaces to 2 immovable structural surfaces by means of 8 mm x 75 mm masonry fixing bolts or coach screws, as is appropriate.
  • At each anchor point the cabinet or container is to be reinforced with a 40 mm x 40 mm x 2 mm metal plate, or a 40 mm x 2 mm metal washer, fitted between the surface of the cabinet or container and the head of the bolt or coach screw.

[Schedule 4 inserted in Gazette 6 Dec 1996 p. 6847-9.]

6. Statutory Declaration

Under the Firearms Regulations 1974 11A (1),

“a person entitled to possess firearms or ammunition of any kind is to ensure that the firearms or ammunition are stored in accordance with this regulation”.

In compliance with this regulation, a firearm licence applicant is required to submit a statement detailing their proposed storage facilities to the WA Police.

This statement, (Statutory Declaration Form 22) will form as part of the firearm licence application process and the declaration is to be provided on request prior to finalisation of the licence assessment. (See 11A and 11C of theFirearms Regulations 1974).

Failure to comply would result in refusal and/or revocation of firearm licences.

It should be noted that the declaration is to include supporting evidence that adequate and safe storage had been installed i.e. receipt from installer and/or photograph of the cabinet in situ with anchoring and/or fixing points.

Tips to remember when considering storage facilities:

  • Be mindful of the location for firearm/ammunition cabinets! Do not place them at obvious locations where it is easily identified.  A garage IS NOT a recommended location!
  • Be mindful of anchoring and fixing bolts when installing firearm storages or containers.
  • Consider installing a security alarm to cover the cabinet/storage/container location.

The Statutory Declaration Form 22 and an example of a completed Statutory Declaration Form 22 Example can be found within our online services.

More information on specifications for storage cabinets or containers can be found above as well as on Schedule 4 of the Firearms Regulations 1974.

 

South Australia:  

website: http://www.police.sa.gov.au/sapol/services/firearms_weapons/firearms_clubs_licences_registration/categories_access_and_security_of_firearms.jsp)

SECURITY OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION – In Buildings

Possession pursuant to firearms licence

Note: firearm includes receivers of firearms.

Reg 38. ( I ) A person (not being a dealer) who has possession of a class A or B firearm, must keep the firearm or receiver secured by-

(a) Securely attaching and locking it to part of the building in which it is kept; or

(b) Keeping it in a locked cabinet made of hardwood or steel that is securely attached to the building in which it is kept, or

(c) Keeping it in a locked safe made of steel that is securely attached to the building in which it is kept; or

(d) Keeping it in a locked steel and concrete strongroom; or

(e) Such other method as is approved by the Registrar.

(2) A person (not being a dealer) who has possession of a class C, D or H firearm must keep the firearm or receiver secured by-

(a) Keeping it in a locked safe made of steel that is securely attached to the building in which it is kept.

(b) Keeping it in a locked steel and concrete strongroom.

(c) Such other method as is approved by the Registrar.

(3) A cabinet or safe referred to in sub regulation (1) or (2) must be-

(a) Fitted with fittings and locks that prevent it from being easily forced open.

(b) Made of material of sufficient thickness to prevent it from being easily broken, opened or destroyed.

(4) Despite sub regulations (1)(C) and (2)(a), a safe need not be attached to the building if it’s mass when empty is 150 kilograms or more.

SECURITY OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION – In Vehicles

21.(1)(d) When a firearm or ammunition is not secured as required by the normal security requirements the holder of the licence must take all reasonable precautions to ensure that the firearm or ammunition is not lost or stolen or does not come into the possession of an unauthorised person.

 

Northern Territory:  

website: http://www.pfes.nt.gov.au/Police/Firearms-Weapons/Firearms-storage-requirements.aspx

Category A/B Firearms

Recommended metal thickness of 3.0mm or more. Thinner materials will be considered on an individual inspection basis where the construction method is sufficient to ensure rigidity or where the cabinet has additional reinforcing to prevent distortion. Materials of less than 2.0mm will not be considered.

  • All edges must be rolled/folded and the door recessed (or flush fitted) and sized to prevent leverage points.
  • All hinges must be secured so that removal of the pin will not allow the door to displace. Internal or trap style hinges are recommended.
  • Provision for at least two bolt down points (four recommended).
  • Two internal locking points. Where dual locks fitted – sufficient separation between the locks to prevent distortion of the door if a forced entry is attempted.
  • If the receptacle weights more than 150kg when empty, is does not need to be bolted to wall or floor.

Category C/D/H Firearms

  • Minimum metal thickness on door of not less than 6mm. Minimum thickness of remainder of cabinet not less than 3mm (subject to individual inspection and approval). Recommended thickness is 6mm all over.
  • All hinges must be non-removable, constructed in such a manner as to prevent easy breaching. Safe style hinges are preferred.
  • Locks must be ‘Safe’ quality, either combination/key/electronic or a combination of above. Small pistol cabinets may have a single lock. All long arm cabinets must have at least two locks.
  • Safe must be fixed to the wall of floor to prevent its easy removal.

Combination cabinet

  • A cabinet, which complies with the requirements of a category A/B cabinet and which, is fitted with an individually locked internal compartment can be used to store category H firearms.
  • The internal cabinet must be of equivalent or greater thickness material to the main cabinet.
  • The internal cabinet can only be accessed by opening the external cabinet first.
  • The internal cabinet must be constructed so that it provides double thickness on the front and sides (i.e. that it is a separate box on the inside of the main cabinet, not just an internal door).
  • Safe must be fixed to the wall of floor to prevent its easy removal.

The Commissioner assesses each cabinet on its individual merit and reserves the right to classify a cabinet to be suitable for a particular category as he deems appropriate.

 

Australian Capital Territory:  

website:  http://www.police.act.gov.au/crime-and-safety/firearms/firearms-storage.aspx

Category A and B firearms (up to and including 10 firearms in total)

  • Firearms must be stored in a locked container that is made of metal or hardwood, lined by steel sheeting and secured by locks of solid metal of a type approved by the firearms registrar.
  • The container must be bolted to the floor/wall or both with a minimum of two suitable anchor bolts in order to prevent its easy removal (unless the mass of the container when empty is 150 kilograms or more).

Category A and B firearms (in excess of 10 firearms in total)

  • Firearms must be stored in a metal container constructed of at least 3mm thick mild steel or in a container constructed of reinforced concrete, double brick or reinforced besser blocks.
  • The container must be fitted with a steel door not less than 3mm thick and if hinged have a fixed locking bar or dogging bolts welded to the inside face of the door.
  • The container must be fitted with a five-lever key deadlock on the door or another locking mechanism providing equivalent security.
  • The container must be attached to the building (unless the mass of the container when empty is 150 kilograms or more).

Category C and H firearms

  • Firearms must be stored in a locked steel safe bolted to the structure of the premises of similar specifications to category A and B for 10 or more firearms. More stringent requirements and specifications apply to storage in excess of 10 category A and B firearms.
  • Where the bolt or firing mechanism can be easily removed from the firearm, it must be stored in a lockable container separate from the firearm.

 Ammunition

  • Ammunition must be stored in a locked drawer or container inside an approved firearms storage container, or in a lockable metal container kept separately from firearms.

 

Tasmania:

website: http://www.police.tas.gov.au/services-online/firearms/firearms-storage

Storage of Category A & B Firearms

To comply with the Firearms Act 1996, when not in use, both Category A and Category B firearms must be stored in a locked receptacle, which meets the minimum construction guidelines outlined below.

All firearms receptacles weighing less than 150kg when empty must be fixed to a floor or a wall, in a manner which prevents easy removal. Note that due to this weight requirement, the majority of receptacles used, including those commercially available, will need to be fixed to the wall or floor. The addition of a fixed permanent weight to a receptacle, is acceptable to bring it up to 150kg, the weight is to be incapable of being removed.

Storage of Category C, D & H Firearms

Category C, D and H firearms can be stored in any of the previously described receptacles except wooden. All receptacles containing Category C, D or H firearms must be securely fixed to the floor or a wall. The receptacle must be constructed of at least 3mm steel sheeting, be fitted with concealed hinges and a commercial quality flush mounted lock.

Ammunition

Ammunition must be stored in a locked container separate from the receptacle containing the firearms. A separate container within the main storage unit is acceptable however, the locks must be different to those used to secure the main cabinet.

Minimum standards for construction of storage receptacles

  • Wooden receptacles should be constructed of hard wood (not chip board or pine) of at least 12mm (½ inch) thickness with the door hinges fixed internally. The door to the receptacle should be flush mounted with a minimal gap between the door edges and the receptacle to reduce leverage points.
  • A receptacle made from concrete should be strengthened with steel reinforced mesh as part of the manufacturing process. The door to the receptacle should be of sufficient strength, with a minimal gap between the door edges and the receptacle to reduce leverage points.
  • The minimum standard for steel or metal receptacles would be a locker room style locker with a solid metal lock. The receptacle must be fixed to the floor or wall with at least two suitable bolts to prevent easy removal. Please note that Brownbuilt (school) lockers do not meet minimum standard for steel or metal receptacles unless they have been reinforced to prevent the door or any panel from being peeled open.
  • The receptacle should be fitted with an effective flush mounted metal lock or if padlocks are used they must be of good quality and have a substantial shackle of hardened steel. The fixture securing the door must be able to resist attempts to be broken without unlocking the padlock, e.g. hammer strikes, twisting and hacksaw. A method of securing the padlock shackle against bolt cutters and cutting should be considered, such as a housing over the lock or a closed shackle padlock.